Dating violence myths

In fact, less than 10% of teen victims report seeking help. Kids are being abused, resources are available, but the link between the two is missing. What follows are some myths about teen dating violence that may prevent youth from seeking help, or receiving help when they do reach out.Myth: If a person stays in an abusive relationship, it must not really be that bad. Almost 80% of girls who have been physically abused will continue to date their abusers. These include fear, emotional dependence, low self-esteem, feeling responsible, confusing jealousy and possessiveness with love, threats of more violence, or hope that the abuser will change.

REALITY: It is estimated that relationship violence occurs in 1⁄4 to 1⁄3 of all intimate relationships.

One in three high school students have been or will be involved in an abusive relationship. Some victims provoke the violence committed by their dates by making them jealous, acting mean, or teasing them into thinking they want to have sex.

40% of teenage girls ages 14 to 17 say they know someone their age who has been hit or beaten by a boyfriend and women ages 16-24 experience the highest rate per capita of intimate violence. FACT: Teen dating violence and sexual assault is estimated to occur between lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth at about the same rate as in straight teen relationships.

The sooner action is taken, be it a police caution, warning or arrest, the greater the chance of stopping the stalking.

Fact: An abusive or violent relationship can happen to anyone in an intimate relationship regardless of marital status.

Search for dating violence myths:

dating violence myths-60dating violence myths-64

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

One thought on “dating violence myths”